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Self portrait, Adriana Pincherle, Gabinetto Vieusseux

Adriana Pincherle

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Pincherle loved experimenting and had a passion for using dramatic color in her works. She was a Roman artist born into a well-known Jewish-Catholic family. When she married painter Onofrio Martinelli, his influence and presence became a very large part of her life and career, yet they each managed to maintain their individual personalities. Her works can be viewed at the Vieusseux Library, a unique institution to the city of Florence. Pincherle’s fondness for French art is evident in this early work, whose visual language is nonetheless mature, thanks to its rich, vibrant impasto. Pincherle proved fond of exploring self-image, an issue she tackled repeatedly, using countless visual languages. In the final decades of her career, Pincherle rediscovered domestic interiors, a subject she had often depicted in the 1940s. She re-adopted the colorful flair she’d learned from Matisse, an artist she had long studied and unfailingly loved. Adriana once remarked, "My painting has always been figurative, not realist. In this sense, I’ve felt much affinity for the Informal movement, which essentially took my passion for color to the extreme."

Twelve Authors, Con Amore

Pincherle’s restored portraits tribute Avant guard authors in vibrant bursts of color.

‘Art and Memory’

Palmerino exhibition compares and contrasts Adriana Pincherle and Eloisa Pacini.

‘Colors of an Artist’

This exhibition at Palazzo Panciatichi marked the twentieth anniversary of Pincherle’s death.

By giving a voice to historic
women artists AWA rescues
and reclaims the ‘hidden half’
of Florence’s art.

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